Author Topic: Buying a starter camera. May I have some guidance?  (Read 2890 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

William

  • Testers
  • Posts: 881
I'll admit I'm copying this from my 'Tex post.

So I'm in an unsure spot.

About a year ago I spent 10 days with a friend's camera. Nothing fancy. What separated it from everything else I had been using was that I was able to play around with exposure, shutter speeds etc. Got a quick tutorial from the tour guide and my photograph composure improved greatly. Kindof had me hooked.

So now I'm tired of trying to get my old point-and-shoot to obey my commands. Car pics are never just right, landscape becomes a challenge of compromise.

I'd like to get out there and start taking better photos. Take a course maybe. Read a book at least. My parents are telling me to do something other than cars. I want a camera that I can use out of the box, that won't be too challenging to work with. I'm looking new or lovingly used.

And preferably something with enough support that I can continue to use it with new lenses, etc. as I progress. Nothing fancy, but a camera that won't leave me trying to overcome technical limitation (at least for a while) and allow me to learn more about proper manipulation.

First off, how much do I need to spend?

And second of all, what makes and models, and staple lenses should I be looking at?

And most importantly: any staple resources I should look into? I understand that it's more the person than the camera.

Cheers!
'93 Si. - VTEC Purgatory

malamikigo

  • Posts: 4384
  • pebbleandpine.ca
    • Phrozen Photography
Re: Buying a starter camera. May I have some guidance?
« Reply #1 on: Nov 18, 14, 19:08 »
How much do you WANT to spend?  There are options available in all price brackets.  I shoot professionally and am happy to offer some guidance, but give me a price range to work with first.   

Give me two numbers....first the "I'd be happy spending this much" number, and then the "if I HAD to, I could probably spend this much" number.

RyanAnthony

  • Posts: 706
Re: Buying a starter camera. May I have some guidance?
« Reply #2 on: Nov 18, 14, 20:27 »
Play with a few nikons, and canons. See which you like the feel of more. No those are not your only options but they are your most likely options.
kids now want to have the hellafrush looked with stretched tires that totally throw off speedo's and mileage tracking. They don't care about ride quality and fuel economy. - Vangruver

syncroboy

  • Posts: 3058
Re: Buying a starter camera. May I have some guidance?
« Reply #3 on: Nov 19, 14, 01:10 »
How much do you WANT to spend?  There are options available in all price brackets.  I shoot professionally and am happy to offer some guidance, but give me a price range to work with first.   

Give me two numbers....first the "I'd be happy spending this much" number, and then the "if I HAD to, I could probably spend this much" number.

^ This.  Plus if you just want a baseline for gear. Here's some criteria:

Entry level models are less money but it also means spending more money down the road as your capabilities grow.  But if you actually take the time to learn technique, you can shoot some impressive images with an entry level body.

Lenses - spend your money here.  Bodies will constantly get upgraded and superseded with more features...sometimes more than you want in a camera.  For starters, the 18-200 (or similar range) lens is something that every DSLR owner should have.  It's versatile and covers most shooting situations.  If i had only one lens to work with, this would be it.

The latest question in terms of gear is - DSLR or Mirrorless.  Mirrorless cameras with interchangeable lenses are serious competitors to DSLR's now.  They're still fairly high priced but the lenses and support are quite good.  They are also more compact than a typical SLR body

Do you need video capability?  Most bodies have video these days.  It's just a matter of how much and when you'll be shooting video.
"..here at Dubberz.com we like to live in the 60's where cars are cool, fitness is awesome, drinking is good for you, and womanizing is encouraged."  TARGET

Jonnymooshoo

  • Testers
  • Posts: 2092
    • 2004 MK4 .:R32
Re: Buying a starter camera. May I have some guidance?
« Reply #4 on: Nov 19, 14, 09:36 »
I know it will be hard, but think long term about what you want to accomplish and how you will be using your camera.

Is this just a hobby?
Are you ok with buying Used or do you want new gear only?
Do you have ambitions to go pro or do it to earn money?
Is this mostly for travel?
Will you want to keep your camera with you all the time?
Will you be printing any of your photos?
Do you want the convenience of upload to the web from camera?
Do you want the ability to control the camera with your phone?
Do you want to shoot action, sports, portrait, landscapes, street?
Do you need good low light capabilities?

There are many options out there for whatever kind of shooter you are.

Staple / resources:

Buy this book to learn everything about the fundamentals over a weekend. I can't recommend this enough.
http://www.chapters.indigo.ca/books/product/9780817439392-item.html?s_campaign=goo-PLATest&gclid=CjwKEAiAnLGjBRCk_I-y_4iAmB0SJADGjWWzlQMZCxUG5HgzhBjD3Zy_R6FKE8iWEhgczjwJixeAxBoCGR_w_wcB

Websites and Youtube are your friends.
Youtube Subscribe to: Kelby Training, B&H Photo, Adorama, phlearn. Tons of professionals have seminars and workshops posted on youtube.
Website: www.creativelive.com  free live streaming webinars
Soak up the information. eg. Even if you don't shoot wedding photography, there will be transferable skills and techniques you will learn.

Buy the photographer subscription to Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom. $10 a month
You will need to post process your work. Think of it as "developing your negatives"
Minor adjustments will make the difference. Digital sensors can only get you so far and you do need software to help sharpen, and bring out the same amount of colour and detail that your eyes can see.

Shoot Shoot Shoot.
The more you practice the better you will get it's as simple as that. Find some friends who also are into photography and shoot with them. If you're interested I'd be happy to chat over a coffee or  bring you along to my next photo-shoot to discuss any of this.


William

  • Testers
  • Posts: 881
Re: Buying a starter camera. May I have some guidance?
« Reply #5 on: Nov 19, 14, 12:01 »
How much do you WANT to spend?  There are options available in all price brackets.  I shoot professionally and am happy to offer some guidance, but give me a price range to work with first.   

Give me two numbers....first the "I'd be happy spending this much" number, and then the "if I HAD to, I could probably spend this much" number.

I have no idea how much I should be spending on a started rig. So I'm willing to wait and save until I can for out on recommended gear, rather than going and spending $600 on a camera because its my budget and finding out in a while I need to fork out more on something else.


Do you need video capability?  Most bodies have video these days.  It's just a matter of how much and when you'll be shooting video.

I'd like some decent capability. Not because I'd use it much, but its always a possibility.

I know it will be hard, but think long term about what you want to accomplish and how you will be using your camera.

Is this just a hobby?
Are you ok with buying Used or do you want new gear only?
Do you have ambitions to go pro or do it to earn money?
Is this mostly for travel?
Will you want to keep your camera with you all the time?
Will you be printing any of your photos?
Do you want the convenience of upload to the web from camera?
Do you want the ability to control the camera with your phone?
Do you want to shoot action, sports, portrait, landscapes, street?
Do you need good low light capabilities?

There are many options out there for whatever kind of shooter you are.

Staple / resources:

Buy this book to learn everything about the fundamentals over a weekend. I can't recommend this enough.
http://www.chapters.indigo.ca/books/product/9780817439392-item.html?s_campaign=goo-PLATest&gclid=CjwKEAiAnLGjBRCk_I-y_4iAmB0SJADGjWWzlQMZCxUG5HgzhBjD3Zy_R6FKE8iWEhgczjwJixeAxBoCGR_w_wcB

Websites and Youtube are your friends.
Youtube Subscribe to: Kelby Training, B&H Photo, Adorama, phlearn. Tons of professionals have seminars and workshops posted on youtube.
Website: www.creativelive.com  free live streaming webinars
Soak up the information. eg. Even if you don't shoot wedding photography, there will be transferable skills and techniques you will learn.

Buy the photographer subscription to Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom. $10 a month
You will need to post process your work. Think of it as "developing your negatives"
Minor adjustments will make the difference. Digital sensors can only get you so far and you do need software to help sharpen, and bring out the same amount of colour and detail that your eyes can see.

Shoot Shoot Shoot.
The more you practice the better you will get it's as simple as that. Find some friends who also are into photography and shoot with them. If you're interested I'd be happy to chat over a coffee or  bring you along to my next photo-shoot to discuss any of this.



Hobby, well sure. Don't want to every fall into the giant watermark facebook page category.

Ambition. Yes. If i'm going to do something I'm going to take my time and learn it right. Even if I never get to a level that I can present myself as a pro, I always want to leave the windows open for possibilities involving friend or acquaintances. Its the same with my music. I'm at no level to fill a concert hall but fill the air as you walk up the aisle.

Travel, naw. I have some road trip ideas but I don't have time or money to travel outside the Lower Mainland much.

I'll likely keep my camera with me often. Meets, Sunday drives, the works. I won't get far if I don't start snapping.

I may print. Sure, if get something worth hanging on my wall, why not. Could make a nice gift.

Upload to the web is sure cool but hey, I don't mind uploading my images to flikr before transferring them to my watermarked FB page.

I don't have a phone, so no, I don't need that capability yet. Maybe some time.

From what I currently am interested in, primary automotive and landscape stuff interests me.

Low light capabilities a plus in these winter months after work, or at meets and whatnot. Love going out for drives around dusk as well; I hit up Steveston last Sunday and it was spectacular.

Shoot Shoot Shoot.
The more you practice the better you will get it's as simple as that. Find some friends who also are into photography and shoot with them. If you're interested I'd be happy to chat over a coffee or  bring you along to my next photo-shoot to discuss any of this.


I'd much appreciate that. I just moved to the Lower Mainland so I don't really know people in this field of expertise.

Thanks for all the input. Gave me a good bit of stuff to consider.

'93 Si. - VTEC Purgatory

Jonnymooshoo

  • Testers
  • Posts: 2092
    • 2004 MK4 .:R32
Re: Buying a starter camera. May I have some guidance?
« Reply #6 on: Nov 19, 14, 23:26 »
Sounds like you would be happy in the enthusiast semi pro level. Something that would let you grow into it.
Best buy these days take a serious look at the Sony a6000
If you want a more traditional DSLR, look at the d7100 or a used d7000. (I think Taylor smith is selling his right now)
Canon equivalent would be the canon 70d

William

  • Testers
  • Posts: 881
Re: Buying a starter camera. May I have some guidance?
« Reply #7 on: Nov 20, 14, 08:08 »
Sounds like you would be happy in the enthusiast semi pro level. Something that would let you grow into it.
Best buy these days take a serious look at the Sony a6000
If you want a more traditional DSLR, look at the d7100 or a used d7000. (I think Taylor smith is selling his right now)
Canon equivalent would be the canon 70d

Thanks again. Will research.
'93 Si. - VTEC Purgatory